Brantley Gilbert

Brantley Gilbert

Bleu Edmondson

Fri, July 29, 2011

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$12.50 - $15.00

Sold Out

This event is all ages

Brantley Gilbert 8:00 pm Friday, July 29 with special guest Bleu Edmondson. Doors open at 7:00 pm. Advance tickets are $12.50 at The Cotillion, online @ thecotillion.com, by phone 316-722-4201 or at the employee clubs. Tickets on the day of the show will be $15.00. For further information and to charge tickets by phone call 316-722-4201 or logon to thecotillion.com. No service fees for tickets purchased at The Cotillion box office open 8 am - 6 pm Monday thru Saturday.

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Brantley Gilbert
Brantley Gilbert
Although it's tempting to call Brantley Gilbert a country artist -- he certainly embraces the outlaw country side of things -- in many ways his music is closer to the heartland sentiments of artists like John Mellencamp, Bruce Springsteen, and perhaps most apt, Steve Earle. Gilbert was born in the small town of Jefferson, GA, just outside of Athens. He grew up hearing country music, but he also heard a lot of Athens rock bands like R.E.M. and the B-52's and the swaggered Southern rock of bands like Lynyrd Skynyrd -- at his best, Gilbert blends all of these various strains together in his music. It was a near-fatal car accident when he was 19 years old that spurred Gilbert to give music his all, and he started writing songs in earnest, playing mostly solo acoustic gigs before forming a band that could bring his vision of a hard-stomping country/rock/soul show to fruition. Moving to Nashville, he signed with Warner Chappell Publishing (his songs have been recorded by the likes of Jason Aldean and Colt Ford) and began working toward completing an album. Modern Day Prodigal Son was slated for release in 2006 when Gilbert was abruptly dropped by his label. The album finally appeared three years later in 2009 from Average Joe's, which also released the follow-up, Halfway to Heaven, in 2010.
Bleu Edmondson
Bleu Edmondson
With The Future Ain’t What It Used To Be, Bleu Edmondson‟s long-awaited follow-up to 2007‟s critically acclaimed Lost Boy, the southern-fried country rocker embarked on a search for truth, stripping back layers of regret, loss, and longing to uncover a renewed, albeit somewhat painfully soul-baring, view of himself and the world around him. He dug deeper into what the music meant to him as a musician, a writer and a man. “Writing is like holding up a mirror to those darkest corners of our lives that we keep hidden,” confides the raspy-throated singer. “It‟s not always a pretty reflection, but it‟s real and it matters.” The collection of songs ministers to the saint and the sinner in each of us. It is an amalgamation of those touch points and influences that give us permission to question, confront and raise a little hell on Saturday night.