Asking Alexandria

Asking Alexandria

Motionless in White, Whitechapel, Chimaira, I Killed the Prom Queen

Fri, April 19, 2013

Doors: 6:00 pm / Show: 6:30 pm

$25.00 - $28.00

This event is all ages

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Asking Alexandria
Asking Alexandria
Asking Alexandria. They have risen from nothing to greatness in little over a year. 2009 saw the boys from England release their debut album 'Stand Up and Scream' to an audience just begging for something slightly different, and the 5 english lads delivered. 'Stand up and Scream' has done better than anyone could have hoped for. 2009 was spent touring with many great bands across the United States..., including, Enter Shikari, A Static Lullaby, Alesana and many more. 2010 has the boys touring relentlessly world over and writing the next chapter in their lives. With a hectic year ahead of them Asking Alexandria look set to take the world by storm. If you didn't hear of them in 2009 or 2010 2011 is the year everyone will be talking about Asking Alexandria.
Motionless in White
Motionless in White
A new breed of dark rockers is subtly taking over, stealing the hearts of a dedicated legion of fans, with a blend of intense melodic metal and a penchant for the macabre. Already fan favorites in the scene, Pennsylvania sextet Motionless In White is set to rise to the front of the pack.

Their debut full-length album Creatures is a writhing behemoth of an album. Mixing gothic and industrial influences with brutal breakdowns, intense riffs and soaring choruses, the album interweaves themes of lust and revenge with the band's passion for horror movies, myths and vampire culture. The band has since been named as one of Metal Hammer's "75 Bands That Will Change The Face Of Metal", Alternative Press' Bands You Need To Know in 2010, and was one of Revolver Magazine's Bands To Watch.The band has made a huge visual impact in 2011 with their provocative videos for "Immaculate Misconception", starring Twisted Sister's Dee Snider, "Creatures" featuring NY Ink tattoo artist Megan Massacre, and "Abigail" which has has gained over 2 million views.

The band has already toured the U.S. with the likes of Asking Alexandria, Bleeding Through, In This Moment and Drop Dead, Gorgeous, Black Veil Brides and A Skylit Drive. After completing their tour with Escape the Fate and Alesana in early 2011, the band appeared at SXSW before launching into a full season of touring that included runs with Norma Jean, For Today, Vans Warped Tour and the All Star Tour with Emmure, and Iwrestledabearonce. The band continues their live onslaught into the fall on their first European tour in September/October with blessthefall and Pierce The Veil.

Armed with their jaw-dropping debut album, support from the media and an impressive live show ready to take to the masses, Motionless In White is poised at the center of a perfect storm, and is taking by the throat in 2011 and on to 2012. Miss them at your peril!
Whitechapel
Whitechapel
As the death metal genre continues to explode, Knoxville’s Whitechapel stand bloody head and bruised shoulders above the pack. With a ruthlessly brutal aural assault built upon merciless blastbeats and spine-destroying breakdowns, their three guitarists deliver immense riffs and monstrous leads while vocalist Phil Bozeman vomits out lyrics that avoid clichés and give fans something to think about as they scream them back. Basically stated, this is as shit-your-pants exhilarating as modern metal gets.

Formed in 2006, it did not take local metal fans long to realize that they had something very special going on in their midst. “We went from fifty of our friends coming to our shows to two hundred people coming out inside of six months,” guitarist Alex Wade states. “We’ve always held ourselves to a certain level of professionalism, we worked our asses off, and I think we definitely offered something that a lot of bands in the scene did not.”

Building such momentum, it is unsurprising that the sextet – rounded out by guitarists Ben Savage and Zach Householder, bassist Gabe Crisp, and drummer Kevin Lane – soon found themselves courted by record labels, signing to the UK’s Siege Of Amida, for their 2007 debut, The Somatic Defilement (with Candlelight handling the US release). Hitting the road hard, both their profile and army of fans grew rapidly. Inside of a year, they were signed by Metal Blade following an intense bidding war between eight labels hungry to add the Tennessee wrecking crew to their roster, and the band immediately set about working on their second album, the titanic This Is Exile.

A quantum leap forward in terms of song writing and focused vitriol, This Is Exile threw a gauntlet down to all others trying to crowd into the genre alongside them. Admitting that the lyrical content on The Somatic Defilement was limited to “typical brutal death metal stuff – songs about evil ways to kill people and that kind of thing”, Bozeman approached This Is Exile in a far more cerebral manner, uniting the songs through a core concept. “The record was a lot more about the kind of evil that actually exists in the world,” the vocalist states. “It was about three specific people who hunger after power, which leads them to starting a diabolical war that ends the world. I was really proud of it, because it had a lot more feeling and maturity about it, and it gave people something a little different.”

Having sold 6000 copies of This Is Exile in its first week, the band once again toured relentlessly, playing shows in the US, Canada, and Europe, and sharing the stage with such luminaries as Cannibal Corpse, Slayer, Killswitch Engage, Unearth, Behemoth, and Chimaira, in the process shifting more than 55,000 units. Not a bad feat for a band that most likely cause rock radio programmers to hide quaking beneath their desks.

Following up such a punishing album would be an unenviable task for most, but Whitechapel are just getting started, and A New Era Of Corruption, which was produced by Jason Suecof (The Black Dahlia Murder, Job For A Cowboy) and features guest appearances by Deftones’ Chino Moreno and Vincent of The Acacia Strain, showcases a group who are imposingly focused and determined to write the heaviest, most intense and dynamic music possible. “We didn’t want to put out ‘This Is Exile: Part Two’, and this is definitely a real progression from that record – but, at the same time we wanted it to sound like Whitechapel,” Wade asserts. “Having played with bands like Slayer and Cannibal Corpse, you realize that one of the reasons they’ve been around so long is because they’ve created a certain sound and they’ve stuck to that. Fans want to hear their favorite band sounding like their favorite band, and while we’ll always grow, that’s something I think we’ll strive for on every record from now on.”

Bozeman expands on this, stating that “The first two records are just riff after riff after riff, but this time we have more of a verse-chorus approach, and I think that makes the songs more memorable. Everything is still just as brutal and just as intense, it’s just a little more structured, and that makes for better songs.” And as the band has progressed sonically, so have Bozeman’s lyrics, who this time has jettisoned a concept-based approach but remains just as focused, unleashing a surge of apocalyptic wrath as he covers issues such as the devolution of society into violent, hateful human beings (“Devolver”), the increasing corruption and violence of the post 9/11 world (“Breeding Violence”), and the circumstances surrounding the tragic death of his own mother (“Murder Sermon”).

Primed to take A New Era Of Corruption to hungry audiences around the globe, Whitechapel are continually proving themselves an indomitable force, and their fan base is primed to grow and grow as more people are exposed to their unique brand of sonic violence. Prepare to be corrupted.
Chimaira
Chimaira
There's an obscure Chinese proverb that roughly translates as "There is one thing greater than money and power: Enthusiasm." While some of the more cynical bastards in the world would dismiss that statement as some kind of hollow fortune-cookie philosophy, that lesson is something the Cleveland-based metal outfit Chimaira have taken to heart. With four records and a decade of service in the trenches behind them, the band—singer Mark Hunter, guitarists Rob Arnold and Matt DeVries, bassist Jim LaMarca, drummer Andols Herrick and keyboardist Chris Spicuzza—have created The Infection, their second release for Ferret Music and their most ambitious recording yet.

Sounds like typical record-company bio nonsense, right? Doesn't every band tell you that their latest release surpasses everything they've done up to this point? How many times have you heard the words "maturing" or "progressing" as a rationale to deliver a crap album? For their fifth album, Chimaira didn't have any brushes with death, rehab memories or dalliances in musical genres that have nothing to do with "the rock" as we know it. Sounds crazy, but the truth is that the band have come around full circle, returning to the headspace that brought them together in the first place.

"Every album we've ever made has a back-story that made the creation of that album a pain in the ass," says Mark Hunter about his band's evolution. "When we made our first album [2001's Pass Out Of Existence], we were thrown into the studio for two months with a huge budget, a big producer and no songs. We just rushed through it. When we got the record back, we thought, 'this is not what we signed up for.' When it came to do the next record [2003's The Impossibility Of Reason], we felt like we had something to prove, so we were purposely writing songs that just put up a huge middle finger to everybody that steered us in the wrong direction. Andols had quit, and for the third album [2005's Chimaira], I hardly showed up to work on it. I'm usually working 12 hours a day in the studio; I went in, and did all my songs in four days and left. We got off of Roadrunner, got our old drummer back and signed to Ferret. Now people are questioning our stability and we're thinking we have to make the best record we've ever done because it could be the last one. The touring cycle for [our fourth album] Resurrection went well and we made tons of new fans.
I Killed the Prom Queen